Homeopathy Medicine for Pulmonary Embolism

396

A pulmonary embolism, also known as deep vein thrombosis, is a blockage in one of the pulmonary arteries in the lungs.

By taking precautions to avoid blood clots in our legs, we can help safeguard ourselves against pulmonary embolism. Pulmonary embolism can be fatal because the clots block blood flow to the lungs, but prompt treatment greatly reduces the risk of death.

SYMPTOMS OF PULMONARY EMBOLISM

Depending on how much of the lung is affected, the size of the clots, and whether there is a heart or lung condition underlying the pulmonary embolism, the symptoms can vary greatly.

These are typical warning signs and symptoms:

Shortness of breath

Chest pain

Cough

The following are additional pulmonary embolism warning signs and symptoms:

  • Rapid or irregular heartbeat
  • Lightheadedness or dizziness
  • Excessive sweating
  • Fever
  • Deep vein thrombosis, which typically affects the calf, can cause leg pain, swelling, or both.
  • (Cyanosis) Skin that is clammy or discolored

CAUSES OF PULMONARY EMBOLISM

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT), a condition in which blood clots most frequently originate from the deep veins of the legs, causes these blood clots to most frequently originate from an artery in our lungs, causing pulmonary embolism.

The areas of the lungs served by each blocked artery are deprived of blood and may die, which is known as pulmonary infarction, making it harder for our lungs to supply oxygen to the rest of your body. Multiple clots are frequently involved in pulmonary embolism.

Aside from blood clots, other substances can also obstruct blood vessels, including:

  • A broken long bone’s marrow was fat.
  • Part of a tumor
  • Air bubbles

RISK FACTORS

Blood clots and the ensuing pulmonary embolism can happen to anyone, but certain conditions can make it more likely.

A person is more susceptible if they have a history of pulmonary embolism or venous blood clots in their family.

Additionally, certain medical issues and treatments, like:

  • Heart disease –Clot formation is more likely to occur in conditions involving cardiovascular disease, particularly heart failure.
  • Cancer –Blood clot risk can be increased by a number of cancers, including those that have spread and those that affect the brain, ovary, pancreas, colon, stomach, lung, and kidney, as well as by chemotherapy and by taking tamoxifen or raloxifene in the case of women with a personal or family history of breast cancer.
  • Surgery –Because major surgery, such as joint replacement, is one of the leading causes of problematic blood clots, anti-clotting medication may be administered both before and after the procedure.
  • Disorders that affect clotting –Blood clot risk can be increased by medical conditions like kidney disease as well as some inherited disorders that affect blood and make it more prone to clotting.
  • Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) –Pulmonary embolism risk is higher in people with severe COVID-19 symptoms.

Prolonged immobility

When people are inactive for extended periods of time, such as:

  • Bed rest.When the lower extremities are horizontal for long periods of time, the flow of venous blood slows and blood can pool in the legs, sometimes leading to blood clots. Being confined to bed for a prolonged period after surgery, a heart attack, leg fracture, trauma, or any serious illness makes a person more vulnerable to blood clots.
  • Long trips.Leg blood flow is slowed when people are crammed into a tight space on long plane or car trips, which helps clots form.

Other risk factors

  • Smoking.Some people are more prone to blood clot formation than others for unknown reasons, especially when other risk factors are present.
  • Being overweight.Blood clot risk is increased by being overweight, especially in those who also have other risk factors.
  • Supplemental estrogen.A woman’s blood clotting factors may be increased by estrogen from birth control pills and hormone replacement therapy, particularly if she smokes or is obese.
  • Pregnancy.Because blood is more likely to clot when it slows or pools, the pressure that the baby puts on pelvic veins can cause a delay in the blood returning from the legs.

COMPLICATION OF PULMONARY EMBOLISM

About one-third of people with pulmonary embolism who go undiagnosed and untreated do not survive; however, when the condition is identified and promptly treated, that percentage drops significantly.

When there are obstructions in the arteries that supply blood to the lungs, the heart has to work harder to push blood through those vessels, which raises blood pressure and eventually weakens the heart. Pulmonary embolism can also result in pulmonary hypertension, a condition in which the blood pressure in our lungs and the right side of the heart is too high.

The condition known as chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, which is rare, is caused by small emboli that frequently occur and grow over time.

PREVENTION FROM PULMONARY EMBOLISM

Because deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in our legs can lead to pulmonary embolism, most hospitals are proactive in taking precautions to avoid blood clots, such as:

  • Before and after surgery, blood clot-prone patients are frequently prescribed blood thinners (anticoagulants), as are hospital patients with conditions like heart attack, stroke, or cancer-related complications.
  • Compression stockings-Compression stockings provide a safe, easy, and affordable way to prevent blood from stagnating during and after general surgery. They steadily squeeze your legs, assisting your veins and leg muscles in moving blood more effectively.
  • Raising the bottom of the bed by 4 to 6 inches (10 to 15 cm) with blocks or books can help. **Leg elevation** Elevating the legs when it’s possible and while you sleep can also be very helpful.
  • Physical activity-One of the main reasons nurses may encourage patients to get up, even on the day of surgery, and walk despite pain at the site of surgical incision is that moving as soon as possible after surgery can help prevent pulmonary embolism and speed recovery generally.
  • Pneumatic compression-The goal of this procedure is to improve blood flow by massaging and constricting the veins in the legs using thigh-high or calf-high cuffs that automatically inflate and deflate with air every few minutes.

Prevention while traveling

Drink plenty of fluids.

Take a break from sitting

Fidget in your seat.

Wear support stockings.

HOMEOPATHIC TREATMENT FOR PULMONARY EMBOLISM

The only method by which a state of complete health can be regained by removing all the signs and symptoms from which the patient is suffering is through the use of homeopathic medicine selection, which is based on the theory of individualization and symptoms similarity by using a holistic approach.Apis Mellifica, Arnica, Secale Cor, Phosphorus, Vipera, Carduus Marianus,e.t.c

Comments are closed.